News -

Past patient thanks gas companies for their support of vital aeromedical service

Once upon a time Peter Gilmore could be found at the helm of a freightliner, transporting goods across Australia. But since August last year his life has never been the same. Peter was out polishing the bonnet of his mower when suddenly everything went black. 

"I was sitting in the armchair, then nothing. My wife has told me some things but I don't remember anything," Peter said. 

Peter had suffered a brain aneurysm. After being rushed to Warwick Hospital Peter was flown by the Surat Gas Aeromedical Service (SGAS) helicopter to the Gold Coast University Hospital to receive lifesaving treatment. 

"I had 14 coils put in my head, I was lucky to be alive," Peter said.

Since Peter's brain aneurysm, life has changed dramatically for the 52-year-old father of three. 

"A lot has changed - I can't be on my own. I can't work, drive, potter around my shed or the yard," Peter said. 

"I have a problem with my short term memory, occasional mood swings and in the beginning I felt distant from my family." 

Today Peter met and thanked the companies which sponsor the the Surat Gas Aeromedical Service (SGAS) helicopters. 

"I wouldn't be here without LifeFlight, I could never thank the team which came to my aid enough and the sponsors which help LifeFlight stay in the sky," Peter said. 

Representative from the SGAS consortium, Liz Edwards, said the service provides up to 150 funded hours for community retrievals each year. 

“Since 2011, Queensland gas producers Arrow Energy, Origin Energy, QGC and Santos have partnered with LifeFlight to provide a Roma and Toowoomba-based services for gas industry workers and community members requiring aeromedical transport in the state’s south-west,” Liz said. 

The service has funded 319 community missions since its partnership with LifeFlight began in 2011.
 
"To meet one of those patients today and hear his story is extremely rewarding and we’re proud to support such a vital community service,” Liz said. 

Despite the emotional roller-coaster the Gilmore family has been on the last six months they remain optimistic and try to make the most of every day.

"I want to teach my wife, Helen, how to tow a caravan so we can travel a little. I also hope to get some restoration work done on my EH wagon over the next 12 months," Peter said.